A newspaper that understands social networks: The Independent and i Paper’s use of Twitter

The Independent was founded in 1986 and has since featured much stimulating and radical content between its pages. It has been criticised as being a ‘viewspaper’, as opposed to a newspaper, due to the fact that the paper includes a lot of opinion, comment and reviews. Alan Rusbridger, editor of The Guardian, has said of […]

Leveson and the Internet

Sounds like some weird indie band, right? But no, the Leveson report came out last week and in it, Lord Leveson suggested that a new watchdog, independent of newspapers and MPs, with statutory underpinning, should regulate the press. Although this is what most expected, it means that the press could become diluted and investigative journalism […]

Twitter: a utilisation of knowledge or a collection of ignorance?

Hayek (1979) said ignorance can be conquered “not by the acquisition of more knowledge, but by the utilisation of knowledge which is and remains widely dispersed among individuals.” Alfred Hermida used this quote in his 2010 essay entitled ‘Twittering the news – the emergence of ambient journalism’ to describe micro-blogging. In this post, I am […]

Can print and online journalism ever exist together happily?

Is the online revolution of journalism as fast-paced as everyone thinks? Are newspapers really on the brink of dying a cold, hard, software-related death? Steen Steensen thinks not, as described in his blog post – Online journalism and the promises of new technology, part 1: The revolution that never happenedĀ (2010). I agree with him, to […]

The economics of news – a critique

Paul Bradshaw, an academic journalist blogger, posted on his Online Journalism Blog (OJB) a post entitled ‘How the web changed the economics of news‘ in 2009. In this, he detailed 12 changes news organisations needed to consider in order to cope with the ‘online revolution’ of journalism. While Bradshaw (2009) makes some very good and […]